• Ty’n Llan re-opens

    Thanks mainly to the hard work of the volunteers, everything was in place just in time to reopen the bar, in its existing form. Work started on establishing a programme of community events for young and old alike – from coffee mornings to a walking club, and youth project ‘Ty’n Llan Ni’ to Welsh learners’ club. Ty'n Llan is buzzing with activity while further news on the refurbishment plans and funding are eagerly awaited.

  • Celebrating, clearing and planning

    Volunteers immediately set about cutting the grass and tidying up the garden, and two days of outdoor celebrations in the garden gave us a taste of what was to come. Half a dozen sub-committees were created to coordinate volunteer work to prepare the building for re-opening in its existing form. There were several days of communal painting, repairing and clearing. Architect Elinor Gray-Williams was asked to start planning for the renovation and extension of the building and two possible options were presented for the public’s response. Applications were submitted for a number of grants to help fund these schemes. At the end of November a temporary manager was appointed and a group of enthusiastic young bar staff.

  • £464,800 of investment secured and purchase completed

    The offer closed on 11 June 2021 and when counting and confirmation of all pledges were complete it was announced that the campaign had been a resounding success, raising a staggering £464,800 in community shares. These investments came from a total of 1013 members, half of whom came from the LL54 postcode (5 mile radius) and most of the rest from other parts of Wales. Investments also came in from 28 different countries around the world, demonstrating the international appeal of the story of our campaign to save our local pub. This was more than enough to enable us to complete the purchase of the building on 28 June 2021.

  • Launch of Share Offer and Business Plan

    With the help of the Plunkett Foundation and the Wales Co-operative Centre, a Business Plan and Share Offer for investment in the Society were drawn up and launched with a lively promotional campaign for the Offer. There was a good deal of media coverage with non-stop messaging on social media. Hollywood, TV and sporting celebrities declared their support.

  • ‘Menter Ty’n Llan Cyf’ created

    Given the need to act quickly the first steps were to seek guarantees of short-term loans sufficient to allow a bid to be made for the property, and then to complete the formation and registration of the Society, elect a Committee and invite investment in shares in the venture. A questionnaire was circulated and over 200 responses received. The responses provided a very useful indication of what the community's priorities were for Ty'n Llan, and which services were most likely to be in demand. Following delivery of the survey, negotiations with the agent began and on 10 March 2021, our offer of £325,000 was accepted, subject to contract, and the property was withdrawn from the market.

  • Ty’n Llan for sale

    In February 2021, it was learned that the executors of the owner's estate were planning to put Ty'n Llan up for sale, alongside other assets. Some of those who had been in discussions quickly called a community meeting on Zoom, just days before the sale was advertised. The response was very positive with over 100 people in attendance and clear and strong support for the idea of ​​establishing a Community Benefit Society to buy and run the pub for the benefit of the community.

  • Covid-19 world-wide pandemic

    The world came to a stop in 2020 when the Coronavirus C-19 world-wide pandemic struck. Discussions about the future of Ty'n Llan temporarily stopped as well.

  • ‘Something must be done!’

    The owner died in 2019 and informal conversations within the community suggested that there was a strong desire to 'do something' to save the pub. Many of the villagers had professional experience of working in community enterprise and development and were familiar with the principles and models for community-owned enterprises.

  • Ty’n Llan closes

    The pub had been privately owned for many years and had been managed by a series of tenants. The most recent of these were the late Huw Edwards ('Huw Taxis') and his wife Enid. In December 2017 they decided to end the tenancy, and Ty'n Llan was closed. The lack of a meeting place in the village was strongly felt.

  • Welsh music hub

    Edward H Dafis, Meic Stevens, Geraint Jarman, Crys, Brân, Hergest, Bando – just some of the big names of the Welsh rock scene who came to Ty’n Llan to relax, and sometimes even to write songs (quite often on the backs of beer mats!), while they were recording their albums at the Sain recording studio during the 1970s and later. The original studio was in old farm outbuildings at Gwernafalau some 300 metres from the village centre, and a new studio was later built on a former RAF site 1½ miles down the road.

  • The Victorian building

    In the collection of the Glynllifon estate’s documents an architect’s design for Ty’n Llan is dated 1864 showing a plan for the two floors and views of the front of the building and of the garden-facing gable end. This strongly suggests that this is when the current premises were built. It may be that it was after this that the inn was given an English name as well as the Welsh one, since it is in 1865 that the first reference to the Harp Inn, Llandwrog is seen. Despite this, it was the Welsh name which was retained colloquially.

  • Eben Fardd poetry commissioned

    It was at the beginning of this year that the poetry which appears on the slate plaque at the front of Ty’n Llan was paid for. On January 20, 1832, Eben Fardd (Ebenezer Thomas, 1802-1863), the poet and schoolmaster from Clynnog), notes in his diary that he has received ten shillings and sixpence ‘’being a gratuity from Lord Newborough [the owner of the Glynllifon estate], for some Welsh and English lines I had composed at his Lordship’s request, to be put over the door of a public house at Llandwrog.” It is possible, of course, that these englynion were not used until the new building was constructed.

  • Llandwrog developed as model village

    When the second Lord Newborough came of age in 1823 he started to plan and build a ‘model village’ for servants and pensioners of the Glynllifon estate, starting with the row of single-chimney cottages to the east of the pub.

  • Ty’n Llan on the map

    Ty’n Llan stood on land belonging to the extensive Glynllifon estate. A map of the estate in 1751 refers to Ty’n Llan as the ‘Church Ale House and Garden’, confirming that there was definitely a tavern there by then.

  • The earliest record of an inn on site

    The earliest record of publicans in the parish of Llandwrog comes from the year 1652, and it is perfectly possible that Ty’n Llan was there by then. A century earlier, in 1552, the first parliamentary Act was passed compelling publicans to commit to keeping order on their premises. This was the beginning of the procedure of licensing taverns – one which remains in force today.

16 December 2021July-November 2021June 2021April 2021March 2021February 2021March 20202020December 20171970s onwards1906186418321830s17511652
  • 16 December 2021

    Ty’n Llan re-opens

    Thanks mainly to the hard work of the volunteers, everything was in place just in time to reopen the bar, in its existing form. Work started on establishing a programme of community events for young and old alike – from coffee mornings to a walking club, and youth project ‘Ty’n Llan Ni’ to Welsh learners’ club. Ty'n Llan is buzzing with activity while further news on the refurbishment plans and funding are eagerly awaited.

  • July-November 2021

    Celebrating, clearing and planning

    Volunteers immediately set about cutting the grass and tidying up the garden, and two days of outdoor celebrations in the garden gave us a taste of what was to come. Half a dozen sub-committees were created to coordinate volunteer work to prepare the building for re-opening in its existing form. There were several days of communal painting, repairing and clearing. Architect Elinor Gray-Williams was asked to start planning for the renovation and extension of the building and two possible options were presented for the public’s response. Applications were submitted for a number of grants to help fund these schemes. At the end of November a temporary manager was appointed and a group of enthusiastic young bar staff.

  • June 2021

    £464,800 of investment secured and purchase completed

    The offer closed on 11 June 2021 and when counting and confirmation of all pledges were complete it was announced that the campaign had been a resounding success, raising a staggering £464,800 in community shares. These investments came from a total of 1013 members, half of whom came from the LL54 postcode (5 mile radius) and most of the rest from other parts of Wales. Investments also came in from 28 different countries around the world, demonstrating the international appeal of the story of our campaign to save our local pub. This was more than enough to enable us to complete the purchase of the building on 28 June 2021.

  • April 2021

    Launch of Share Offer and Business Plan

    With the help of the Plunkett Foundation and the Wales Co-operative Centre, a Business Plan and Share Offer for investment in the Society were drawn up and launched with a lively promotional campaign for the Offer. There was a good deal of media coverage with non-stop messaging on social media. Hollywood, TV and sporting celebrities declared their support.

  • March 2021

    ‘Menter Ty’n Llan Cyf’ created

    Given the need to act quickly the first steps were to seek guarantees of short-term loans sufficient to allow a bid to be made for the property, and then to complete the formation and registration of the Society, elect a Committee and invite investment in shares in the venture. A questionnaire was circulated and over 200 responses received. The responses provided a very useful indication of what the community's priorities were for Ty'n Llan, and which services were most likely to be in demand. Following delivery of the survey, negotiations with the agent began and on 10 March 2021, our offer of £325,000 was accepted, subject to contract, and the property was withdrawn from the market.

  • February 2021

    Ty’n Llan for sale

    In February 2021, it was learned that the executors of the owner's estate were planning to put Ty'n Llan up for sale, alongside other assets. Some of those who had been in discussions quickly called a community meeting on Zoom, just days before the sale was advertised. The response was very positive with over 100 people in attendance and clear and strong support for the idea of ​​establishing a Community Benefit Society to buy and run the pub for the benefit of the community.

  • March 2020

    Covid-19 world-wide pandemic

    The world came to a stop in 2020 when the Coronavirus C-19 world-wide pandemic struck. Discussions about the future of Ty'n Llan temporarily stopped as well.

  • 2020

    ‘Something must be done!’

    The owner died in 2019 and informal conversations within the community suggested that there was a strong desire to 'do something' to save the pub. Many of the villagers had professional experience of working in community enterprise and development and were familiar with the principles and models for community-owned enterprises.

  • December 2017

    Ty’n Llan closes

    The pub had been privately owned for many years and had been managed by a series of tenants. The most recent of these were the late Huw Edwards ('Huw Taxis') and his wife Enid. In December 2017 they decided to end the tenancy, and Ty'n Llan was closed. The lack of a meeting place in the village was strongly felt.

  • 1970s onwards

    Welsh music hub

    Edward H Dafis, Meic Stevens, Geraint Jarman, Crys, Brân, Hergest, Bando – just some of the big names of the Welsh rock scene who came to Ty’n Llan to relax, and sometimes even to write songs (quite often on the backs of beer mats!), while they were recording their albums at the Sain recording studio during the 1970s and later. The original studio was in old farm outbuildings at Gwernafalau some 300 metres from the village centre, and a new studio was later built on a former RAF site 1½ miles down the road.

  • 1864

    The Victorian building

    In the collection of the Glynllifon estate’s documents an architect’s design for Ty’n Llan is dated 1864 showing a plan for the two floors and views of the front of the building and of the garden-facing gable end. This strongly suggests that this is when the current premises were built. It may be that it was after this that the inn was given an English name as well as the Welsh one, since it is in 1865 that the first reference to the Harp Inn, Llandwrog is seen. Despite this, it was the Welsh name which was retained colloquially.

  • 1832

    Eben Fardd poetry commissioned

    It was at the beginning of this year that the poetry which appears on the slate plaque at the front of Ty’n Llan was paid for. On January 20, 1832, Eben Fardd (Ebenezer Thomas, 1802-1863), the poet and schoolmaster from Clynnog), notes in his diary that he has received ten shillings and sixpence ‘’being a gratuity from Lord Newborough [the owner of the Glynllifon estate], for some Welsh and English lines I had composed at his Lordship’s request, to be put over the door of a public house at Llandwrog.” It is possible, of course, that these englynion were not used until the new building was constructed.

  • 1830s

    Llandwrog developed as model village

    When the second Lord Newborough came of age in 1823 he started to plan and build a ‘model village’ for servants and pensioners of the Glynllifon estate, starting with the row of single-chimney cottages to the east of the pub.

  • 1751

    Ty’n Llan on the map

    Ty’n Llan stood on land belonging to the extensive Glynllifon estate. A map of the estate in 1751 refers to Ty’n Llan as the ‘Church Ale House and Garden’, confirming that there was definitely a tavern there by then.

  • 1652

    The earliest record of an inn on site

    The earliest record of publicans in the parish of Llandwrog comes from the year 1652, and it is perfectly possible that Ty’n Llan was there by then. A century earlier, in 1552, the first parliamentary Act was passed compelling publicans to commit to keeping order on their premises. This was the beginning of the procedure of licensing taverns – one which remains in force today.